Goats, Mountains, and Snow in Morocco

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Katy and I said goodbye to Rachid and Mohammad in Imlil and they headed back to their village about 10km away. Imlil had gotten about 6-8 inches of snow in the past two days and it was the first “real snow” of the year everyone was quick to point out. Last year was a wet winter with a lot of snow, but this one has been really dry and it was actually the first time that the pass has been closed.

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The valley leading to Imlil

Imlil is a end of the road mountain town at 5,700 feet that sits at the base of Toubkal, a 13,665 foot peak which is the highest in North Africa (not really sure what that means but told it multiple times).

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Katy and I were both in our running shoes and were able to change into boots for the walk in the slush up hill for 10 minutes to our guest house, Dar Adrar. They gave brought down a mule to carry our bags along with some food for dinner and we headed up. It was rather chilly at this point, probably 32F, and I put on my spare jacket. Katy got chilled while doing the walk in the sludge to the house, it didn’t help that her boots were not really waterproof.

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The town of Imlil

Dar Adrar turned out to have 6 other groups staying there and it might have been full. There was a common room with a fireplace, which was roaring, and everyone congregated in there so it had a very cosy feel. The reason that it was so full was that with all of the recent snow no one was able to summit Toubkal the past two days and people that were planning on staying at the refuge 2/3 of the way up did not stay there. Two Americans that we played a game of settlers with later that night said that high on the mountain the snow was waist deep and they turned back because of wind.

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The made road in Imlil. Snow makes “traffic” a mess. There were more tourists here than I expected

We spend the evening playing settlers and hanging out in the guest house and then went to our room which was heated by a wood stove and lots of blankets. The downside was that in the morning it was plenty chilly in the room.

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People headed to clear snow off of roofs with homemade shovels

We then donned our rental boots ($2.50) and headed walking up the valley. We didn’t really have a set path but since it had snowed so much we at least knew our options since they were already trampled down. We ending up going up the start of the Toubkal trail and after a bit turned around.

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Imlil at night from Dar Adrar

We then headed to Marrakech and decided to spend $5 extra dollars and have a nice ride arranged instead of trying to do it on the fly.

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Some goats impeding our progress

 

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It Snows in Morocco

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Desert Sunset

We departed Fes to start a four day tour ending in the mountains outside of Marrakesh in a haphazard manner. My email communication with the guide we hired, Rachid, said 9am. Someone from the riad we stayed at knocked at our door at 745 with Rachid on the phone wanting to know where we were. We ate some breakfast and met him at 830, Katy needed her coffee.

We booked a trip through Rachid to take us from Fes to Imlil, a village near Marrakesh via the desert over 4 days. We were pleasantly surprised to have Rachid the owner of the country actually be our tour guide and his brother Mohammad our driver.

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Ifrane, a mountain town that looks like a European town

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Storks are everywhere

A couple things about cars and traffic rules in Morocco. Honking gives you the right of way and says to the other person move out of the way. The larger vehicle also has the right of way. Cyclists have zero right of way if someone honks they have to go off the road into the gravel. There are no shoulders. Abrupt edge describes most of the sides of the roads. Most of the time the traffic cops will give you 5% leeway on the speed limit. Bribing the cops is expectable and expected. There are a lot of police checkpoints, they pull over people who look shady. The centerline is a mere suggestion, if there is no traffic most people just drive down the center of the road. It takes way longer to get places since they don’t really believe in wide or straight enough roads to warrant a high speed limit.

It was great having Rachid who spoke English really well to ask all of the questions that have been building up over the past few days from what a fruit was (prickly pear) to taxes to street cleaning procedures.

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A small Berber village in the Atlas Mountains

The first day mainly involved driving with a couple minor stops to the desert where we were promptly escorted onto camels for a 60ish minute sunset ride to out desert camp. Since a storm was brewing the sunset was actually really good. The camel ride was great for the first 14 minutes but after that the novelty kind of wore off. We spent the night in a very large sand dune area which is one of three main dune areas tourists in Morocco go to. We shared the camp which had some lights powered by solar panels (when I was in the desert in Jordan it was all candle/lantern powered) with a group of three.

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We saw a couple people’s kitted out riding bikes

Katy and I managed to wake up and get out of bed in the cold desert to trudge up a dune to watch sunrise. Sunset was better and warmer… We then hopped back on our camels, mounting and dismounting camels is very amusing since they sit down for that and stand up with hind legs first and then their front legs creating some unique jerks and angles, and ride back to the non sand dune area in the warm morning light.

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We had a “quick” shower and some breakfast and headed in the car through some oasis to Todra Gorge. The wind had really started to pick up at during the drive, creating some sandy windstorm characteristics and some dust devils. During our walk through the gorge the wind picked up and at one point was blowing so hard that it was carrying large chunks of stuff that actually hurt when they hit you. We quickly exited the gorge and got in the car to head to the next gorge, Dades Gorge.

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Skoura Oasis

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The storm blowing wind

Dades Gorge was not as overtly windy, but it was windy enough that during dinner power was knocked out for the rest of the night. That meant the hotel resorted to candles in the hallways and at dinner. We were given a candle lantern to take into our room and I was given a candle to go to the bathroom with. After dinner we had some whiskey and coke and played settlers via lantern.

He next morning we woke up to snow out side and had a couple hour hike planned. We went to do our scheduled walk and the look on Katy’s face when she found out we had to take our shoes off to walk through the “river” while it was snowing out was enough to decide we should do plan b and walk along the canyon instead of up it. We did discover that the wind was at times 60mph the day before and I believe it.

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A truck waiting for the pass to open

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Eating by candle light

We learned that he groups that went to the desert that night had to have 4 wheel drive vehicles pick them up and take them back to hotels since the wind was so high. We stopped at a kabash (big fortified mud brick home) and then headed to a UNESCO kabash, Ait Ben Haddou.

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Ait Ben Haddou was pretty cool and the site that several movies including gladiator was filmed at. During dinner we were briefed on the plan for the next day and it depended on the amount of snow. We have to go over the highest mountain pass (~8000 feet) to get to Marrakesh/Imlil and had been closed all of today because of the snow. Unfortunately in the morning the pass was closed with speculation that it would open at 4pm, but nobody certain.

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Heading to Tizi ‘Test pass

We decided to go the long way around and try a small pass that is not as high called Tizi Test. Unfortunately this meant that we were going to skip one of the sites that I really wanted to see and had added special to the tour, but life happens. We were able to make it over the second pass which was slushy at times and finally made it Imlil around 4pm

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The town of Imlil

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Buying donkeys for $100 in Morocco

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FACT: Moroccan Sun is Hot

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Moulay Idress

 

It has been a great past couple of days. We first headed to Meknes, the smallest of the three imperial cities. We of course arrived at the train station 5 minutes after a train had left so we purchased first class, assigned seat tickets ($18 each) for in an hour and went to find some breakfast.

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What I thought was a going to be a great breakfast turned into a noodle and fish filled pastry, still a little confused. Ranks up there with biting into a curry filled donut and hotdog filled donut as most disappointing donuts while traveling

We had one talkative fellow, Omran, from Libya who was an Arabic teacher in Morocco getting his PhD in our cabin. Our conversation was very stilted since Katy and my Arabic is limited to hi, thanks, let’s go, and maybe, but Omran’s English grasp was a little larger. He did give us a piece of advice that we will head, don’t travel to Libya in the near future.

 

We had a bear of a time finding a taxi after we left the train at 2pm and ended up walking to our riad (1-2 miles). I know I live in Colorado and am use to the sun having a huge effect on the weather, but in morocco it might even be greater. It feels like the sun adds 10-20 degrees and on the walk to the riad we were sweating but when we left the riad in the tight shady medina I needed long sleeves. This riad was of traditional design with intricate tile work on the walls and detailed ceiling plaster? work ($28).

We set out to find the big mosque and visit the sites. We initially couldn’t find the big mosque and later realized that the medina was built all around it so tightly that it really didn’t have any discernible exterior and was just sporadic entrances.

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A truck trying to make it through the outer medina

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A medina is a walled city, most of the houses are made of plaster/mud/brick with no space between them. They are closed to cars, but not mopeds and motorbikes. There are so many roads and alleyways that maps (including Google) don’t show a fraction of them. Thankfully Meknes’ medina is said to be relatively easy to get around and less touts and hustle/hassle then Fes and Marrakesh.

We hadn’t eaten lunch at this point and decided to look for a good food option which we didn’t find. I asked Katy with her French to buy us some salted peanuts for us to munch on. Katy was able to manage buying some peanuts and came away with $0.10 worth… Numbers may not be Katy’s strong suit and 100g sounded like way to much so she settled for 50g, afraid she would end up with a suitcase full.

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Main square above which we ate dinner in Meknes

We spent the rest of the afternoon seeing a couple sites and then went for dinner on a terrace overlooking the main plaza. There were performers ranging from bands to men dancing to tell stories and circles of people formed around them, but there were only men in the circles. Some women congregated near the edge of the plaza, but not enough to account for every man in the plaza.

That night we played a game of settlers (i destroyed Katy like normal) and went to bed. The next morning after a breakfast of fried breadish thingy we headed to the grand taxi station to Moulay Idress. A grand taxi is a 1973 Mercedes sedan painted white or blue that leave when they are full and fit six passengers, two in the driver seat and four in the backseat. We decided to splurge and bought ALL the seats in one of the taxis to take us to Moulay Idress (30 minutesish). There is a man who heads the taxis and had a ledger of some sort and told us it would be $6, $3 cheaper then the guidebook said (I always expect more than the guidebook) and we jumped on that.

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Taxi to Moulay Idress

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Some of the maze of Moulay Idress

 

Moulay Idress is a relatively minor touristed city. It’s main claim to fame is holding the mausoleum of one of the people that congealed Morocco and there are pretty well preserved roman ruins a couple miles away which we road bikes to after some minor mechanical repairs (including having one having maybe 10lbs of pressure in the back tire).

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There are actually some flowers in Morocco

The bikes did not really fit us and we took the dirt road, but it was nice to get out. After a couple hours we peddled back 2.5 miles up hill and had a custard filled chocolate pastry washed down by a Fanta to celebrate (I celebrated the bikes not breaking, not sure what Katy celebrated)!!

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That night we were the only people in our guest house and we had arranged to eat dinner there. We decided to get a bottle of Moroccan wine with the meal which actually wasn’t the worse wine I have had!!!!!! Even though Morocco is a predominantly Muslim country alcohol is not illegal, albeit most places don’t sell it. Some hotels, a few restaurants, some bars (mainly associated by men and prostitutes), major grocery stores, and a few shops sell it and it tends to be more expensive.

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Veggies and beef with prune and almond tagine

We had a good dinner and then settled into the room which had a nice sized heater and an electric blanket which Katy turned up to melt your skin off temperature. She wasn’t cold…

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Moulay Idress sunset, it was cold

 

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Casablanca, that is in Morocco

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A fishing boat at the port in Casablance

The adventure to Morocco has begun. It actually started with me having Friday off which necessitated a back country ski tour of the Brainard Lake area before heading to Northern Africa.

King Hassan II mosque and the ocean

King Hassan II mosque and the ocean

Our trip to Casablanca began with a 6 hour layover in Philly where my parents met us and we were able to grab some lunch at Dock Street Brewing. The plane ride was only 7ish hours so after I watched my movie and Katy cried during her Disney movie I took a 4-6 hour sleeping medicine and it turns out only had 3.5ish hours to sleep since the plane ride wasn’t the 8.5 hours advertised. Needless to say I was groggy to the max eating breakfast (read almost fell asleep while drinking tea). Katy wasn’t feeling too hot when we arrived in Madrid and some Tylenol and Zofran later started to feel better once we reached Casablanca.

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Petit taxis, used intercity our rides have been $1-$3, they all should have been less than $2…

Our introduction to Morocco was punctuated by a scuffle in the line for immigration. We had a very uneventful cab ride downtown and then went off exploring. We visited the King Hassan II mosque which was just built ~20 years ago and is the third largest in the world (can fit 25k inside). Most mosques non-Muslims are not allowed in, but this one had a tour which we took. We then walked along the seaside before taking a taxi back to the Sheraton and freshening up.

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Inside Hassan II mosque

We took a stroll through the medina (walled city) and were told by two Moroccans who live in Amsterdam to eat these donuts there were eating. We continued walked to the port, through the security gate, and onto the docks where the fishing boats were cleaning up after a day out. We resisted the temptation to buy a load of fish and went to a busy fish restaurant. I discovered that Katy had never had peel and eat shrimp before.

After dinner we stopped by and had some donuts before taking a taxi to Rick’s Cafe which is based off the one in the movie (Katy really wanted to go). After almost falling asleep while having a drink at Rick’s we took a taxi back to the Sheraton where the taxi driver screwed with meter and the ride cost $3.10 instead of $1. We then fell asleep at 8pm. I was so tired that I didn’t take a sleeping med and after 11pm I woke up on a regular basis (Katy had no such problem with her resident sleep cycle). The benefit was that I was able to get updates on the Super Bowl and see that the Broncos won!!!!

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Donut with marmalade inside

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Line waiting to grab a $0.15 donut

 

I am having a bear of a time uploading photos so posts have been delayed because they are pointless without pictures.

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I Can Pronounce LJUBLJANA

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This post will conclude the events in the Slovenia trip and will be followed up by a thoughts post.  Half of it was written on the plane and the other half a week after getting back so it will be disjointed like normal!!!
Chris walking around Vipava

Chris walking around Vipava

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Wednesday morning I woke up and my tummy wasn’t super happy with me. We had a short (20m, 3000k ft elevation) day in store.  We first rode to Pradjama Castle which is a castle built into the side of a cliff at the entrance to a cave. A robin hood (depending on your opinion) owner of the castle stayed there for a year while under siege and used a secret entrance via the caves for supplies. The castle and audio tour were actually more interesting than normal. At the castle we could tell we were on the Slovenian “tourist trail”.  We saw a couple other cyclotourers including a break apart tandem.
Predjama Castle

Predjama Castle

Cave and castle combined

Cave and castle combined

We then went to Postonjana Caves which is a large cave system and had a tour. It involved a train ride a couple of kilometers into the cave and about an hour walking around. It had been a really hot day and when we exited the cave some clouds had rolled in which was pretty awesome. We have been informed that we are in the third heat wave of the summer. All I know is that it is super hot.
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The cave was actually pretty cool

The cave was actually pretty cool

I am not sure what this sign meant, but I tried to emulate it

I am not sure what this sign meant, but I tried to emulate it

Chris hanging out in a museum

Chris hanging out in a museum

We walked around town and failed to find a grocery store after seeing a sign for one in 400 meters. Chris picked where to eat via the Internet and we had a really good meal including our first craft beer. My eating is still screwed up so I wasn’t hungry, but managed to still eat.
Stuffed squid

Stuffed squid

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The next morning we had breakfast and started our ride into Ljubliana, our last destination in Slovenia. I felt a lot better cycling than the last two days and Chris and I ended up in Ljubljana a few hours ahead of our estimated time. When we stopped for our mid ride machiatto it was served with a mini beignet by a women who had been to Lakewood, CO racing motocross. I wanted an entire plate of the beignets, but figured that it would be way too much coffee if it ones one per beignet…
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Lubljana Castle

Lubljana Castle

The inside of the castle is very much redone to try to separate tourists from as much money as possible

The inside of the castle is very much redone to try to separate tourists from as much money as possible

When we got to town we realized we didn’t do as much elevation as we had planned so we ride to the top of the hill in town which housed the castle. The castle was pretty cool, but had really been outfitted with a lot of modern structures to facilitate separating tourists from their money.  At this point Chris was getting pretty hungry and my stomach was still in the never hungry mode. We grabbed some lunch at a spot just off of the open air market. Ljubljana has an old town area with old buildings and cobblestone streets, most of it is closed to cars. It has a bunch of shops and restaurants and is a pretty nice city. A couple months I hosted a couch surfer, Ana, from Ljubljana who goes to college in Iowa and  Chris and I stayed with her and her mom for a couple days.
Riding up to the castle

Riding up to the castle

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It was great to have other people to talk to and they were a really interesting family. Ana’s mom, Nada, has done 23 Ironman and her father was the first Slovenian to summit Everest without oxygen.  We went on a bike ride with them and spent a couple evenings talking to them and their friends.  It was one of those experiences that makes traveling worth while and that you don’t get if you stay in a hostel and just talk to other travelers.  Also they had internet that was like 7.3 times faster than the next fastest we had (Grandma Cuder was fresh out of internet) which probably made them think we spent way more time on the internet on average than we did the rest of the trip.
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When we went back downtown the first night we went to a craft beer bar and I can safely say that Slovenian craft beer is not very good compared to Boulder’s, but it was a nice break from all the wine we had been drinking.  We had a hard time picking dinner (read I had a hard time picking dinner), it was the first meal in a long time I was actually hungry for, but couldn’t make up my mind where to go.  The place we (I) decided on was lackluster, but it happens.
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The following day we went for a bike ride with Ana and Nada and then back downtown.  We sorted out our train ticked and somehow for $72 we got two tickets to Vienna with bikes.  Half the distance on the way to Maribor on the same train cost $160+. The ticket lady seemed like she enjoyed her job (dealing with foreigners getting international train tickets) and really hooked us up. We then went and had a way better meal than the first night.
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Our last day in Slovenia Chris and I went on a casual bike ride, packed everything up and took the 6 hour train to Vienna.  We grabbed about $15 work of beer and groceries (read meat and cheese) to make it through the train ride which we didn’t have anyone sitting next to us except for the last couple of hours.
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Chris leaving Slovenia

Chris leaving Slovenia

We then rolled in the the Le Meridian around 11pm and they wanted us to park our bikes outside, we weren’t having it so we ended up with our bikes in a back hallway, at least they weren’t in the kitchen like at the Bristol.  We then went to conquer the free minibar and found it was free because it was super lame.
Look closely, we found this really out of place in a palace

Look closely, we found this really out of place in a palace

The following day was our last day of the trip and we were planning on grabbing bike boxes and seeing Vienna for a day.  I wanted a more full day of seeing Vienna than Chris so I set off early and he met me an hour or two later.  We saw a lot of impressive old buildings and clothes and jewels and swords and unicorn horns and other assorted items that were worth a lot of money.
Vienna!!

Vienna!!

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Saukraut

Saukraut

I discovered this dead guy somewhere in Vienna while roaming without Chris

I discovered this dead guy somewhere in Vienna while roaming without Chris

When we went to grab out bicycle boxes from the store that was holding them for us they were closed.  We then realized it was a national holiday so everything was closed (calling 5 other bike stores confirmed this).  We then decided on buying the really expensive bike boxes at 530am at the airport and packing there.  It was going to be a slightly stressful morning, but we had a full roll of duck tape imported from the US.  We got the 445am train to the airport and found out the bike boxes were huge and shitty.  We did pack them up and went to check them (I was taking both the bikes since Chris was traveling longer) and were met by some not so happy to see us British Airline contract employees.  They decided to let us check the boxes and only charged us $85 for the second, not the $150 they were suppose to (mine was free).  When I got to customs in Philly after a layover in Heathrow the bikes didn’t show up which was a relief because it meant I didn’t have to manhandle two bikes.  They also didn’t show up in Denver, WIN.  I think I was one of the few people that thanked American for losing my luggage so I didn’t have to transport it home.
How my bike box arrived home, no bottom.  Bikes were in great shape!!!

How my bike box arrived home, no bottom. Bikes were in great shape!!!

It was a great trip and really different than any of my other ones
Chris and I were pretty happy we were not on this group cyclotour

Chris and I were pretty happy we were not on this group cyclotour

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Slovenia has WINE and MOUNTAINS

Chris at an alpine lake a couple thousand feet up from Grandma Cuder's

Chris at an alpine lake a couple thousand feet up from Grandma Cuder’s

I have found that traveling with someone and on bikes I have a lot less time to make blog posts since most of them previously were written on transportation and in the off hours of the day.
We left grandma Cuder’s and did a really popular hike up to an alpine lake. A lot of the alpine areas have huts that are served by cable cars to resupply. It is kinda nice being able to get a beer at the top of your hike. It seems like there is a mountain hut passport system where you try to get your passport stamped. About the same time Chris and I noticed that the sky was getting a little dark and we decided to head back since the afternoon was calling for 80% showers. We headed back to grandma’s, grabbing a radler on the way.
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Alpine dairy where Chris and I bought a pound of cheese for $5, half sheep/half cow's milk

Alpine dairy where Chris and I bought a pound of cheese for $5, half sheep/half cow’s milk

Chickens at the dairy!!!!

Chickens at the dairy!!!!

Lunch

Lunch

When we got there more of the family had arrived and they had run inside and grabbed some pear grappa, juice, and cups so we could do some post hike shots and juice. We then transitioned to bikes and started powering our way to Bovez, 9 miles away. The ride started to look pretty ominous and about 15 minutes before we got there it started to dump on us and right after we got to the hostel it started to hail. We were soaked, but pumped to miss the hail.
The Soca River, a crazy colored river

The Soca River, a crazy colored river

Bovez is a pretty cool touristy town and it appears that a lot of the tourists are outdoors people and less “general tourists” like Bled. That night we went and hung out in what we discovered was the potato festival.
Potato Festivel

Potato Festival

The next day we were all on plan for an 8am start when Chris’s bike tube broke after being pumped up. He changed the tube and we headed out to town and then discovered it was flat again, so he changed it again and we headed out to wine country via Italy in what turned out to be our longest day yet involving a little less than 60 miles and 6000 ft of climbing.  The route took us through where Italy surrendered in WWI, an area with a lot of trenches and mountain fighting positions. We then continued along a ridges that separates  Italy from Slovenia and grabbed lunch in Italy for lunch. English did not get us very far at lunch compared to 10km away in Slovenia where everyone speaks it. We ended up with pizza because the one page of the real menu was in Italian and the four pages of the pizza menu was in Italian and German.  After the meal I declared that I was done with pizza for the rest of the trip. When we left the restaurant a Swiss guy stopped his car and asked us for directions, we gave some to him, not sure if they were right.
We were running on empty before we ran into the lunch restaurant, fun dip time (imported from the US)!!!!

We were running on empty before we ran into the lunch restaurant, fun dip time (imported from the US)!!!!

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Looking back at the mountains in Slovenia

Looking back at the mountains in Slovenia

Chris and I then dropped off the ridge into Italian wine country. Wine country greeted us with two things, a flat tire for Chris and crazy blast furnace hot like wind. Chris expertly changed his third tube of the day while I sat in the grass looking at grapes. We struggled through the hot weather, using almost all of our water to a gas station outside of our destination, Dobrovo(this is one town name that we can’t tell the difference between how we pronounce it and locals do, but no one has any idea what we are saying and we have to write it to be understood). After a little tired decision making travel talk we decided to go to the wine cellar under the castle and taste some wine (we are back in Slovenia).
The aftermath of Chris and I tasting a few wines

The aftermath of Chris and I tasting a few wines

Slovenia has a few wine producing areas and  mainly produced dry wine grapes with 70% being white and 30% being red. In the store wine costs 2-15€ a bottle. About 20% of the wine produced is considered table wine and the other 80% fits into higher categories of wine. Most of the wine they produce is not exported, but about 15 wineries do export to the states.
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While we were tasting wine one of the servers had a disaster with a bunch of wine glasses and some Austrians came and asked if they could join our table. We of course said yes (not that we could have said no because they already say down). I was not in the mood for company for some strange reason, but Chris was delighted to have someone other than me to talk to and they were pretty funny.
I feel like this is an answer to a lot of questions, Smart? No.

I feel like this is an answer to a lot of questions, Smart? No.

We then cycled a few more miles to the winery that we were staying, Stekar. They had a pool. It was hot. They had a pool!!!!  Needless to say we checked in said we wanted to join them for dinner and went for a swim.  The winery had a great view and a great dinner.

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Nothing like staying in a place with a pool after a being drenched by sweat.  I didn't tell Chris we had a pool, he was happy...

Nothing like staying in a place with a pool after a being drenched by sweat. I didn’t tell Chris we had a pool, he was happy…

Wine and pasta

Wine and pasta

DSC02122  I felt great, but had some GI issues and woke up the next morning pretty dehydrated.  I forced some food down and we got on the bikes for what turned out to be the hardest day for me since I was pretty drained, but a super easy day for Chris (38m, 3k vert, 3 hours peddling). The route brought us back into Italy, through a town with cobblestones, and then over some ridges to another wine valley, Vipava Valley. We tried to stay in some tourist farms there but failed which turned out to be a good thing since one of the ones we looked at turned out to be up a 1000+ foot steep climb.

Cobble stones in Italy that would normally be my jam, not this morning :(

Cobble stones in Italy that would normally be my jam, not this morning 😦

We went to the one restaurant in town open for lunch and then to the tourist information center that also ran wine tasting. Chris and I tasted 11 wines and bought a bottle for a total cost of 8€. While there we got some beta on the ruins of the castle overlooking the town and headed up. A lot of what they call castles are bot castles in my mind, just fancy houses, but this one use to be a real castle.
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We attempted to get dinner at the one open restaurant in town. Two hours after we ordered we were brought one of the three things we ordered and two we didn’t. I had wasn’t really hungry and was eating because I should and Chris was pretty irritated about the entire experience so he negotiated and we are and paid for the one ordered and bounced.
Vipava wine tasting

Vipava wine tasting

View from the ruined Vipava castle

View from the ruined Vipava castle

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